6 Anime With Compelling Female Protagonists to Enjoy in 2019

Women Making Strides Through Anime

An unmissable list of anime with engaging stories and interesting female characters

Anime has come a long way in the past decade, with more and more shows either being aimed at women or featuring strong, compelling, and well-rounded female protagonists. In the past year, we’ve had five fantastic anime that center around major themes of loss, self-discovery, adventure, and more. And each of these five showcase beloved and inspirational protagonists and sometimes even an entire cast of complex and endearing female characters. So, let’s take a look at these five anime with compelling female protagonists. These shows are all available with subtitles or dubbed into English and just waiting to be binge-watched.


1. Laid-Back Camp


Some of the most charming anime to have come out of recent years has revolved around the tight friendships of a group of young girls. Watching them grow, discover their own strengths and weaknesses, and work as a team to become stronger together is an absolute delight. Laid Back Camp (also called Yuru Camp) is one of the best examples. It follows the story of Rin, a girl who loves to camp in seclusion as she enjoys nature by herself. During one trip, she meets and helps the lost Nadeshiko, and the two become unlikely friends. At school, they join the Outdoor Activities Circle and the member of this club all work together to take trips out into the Japanese wilderness.

Where Laid Back Camp sets itself apart is in its depiction of personalities that are usually embodied by men. Especially Rin, the aloof loner who enjoys her own quiet company over that of others. It’s an anime that shows the deeper complexities of friendship between young girls as opposed to the tired trope of kawaii girls and their carefree games.

Where to watch: Amazon Prime Video


2. A Place Further than the Universe


It might be a little too bold to say this but I’ll say it anyway: A Place Further than the Universe is one of the best anime of the past decade. It tells the story of four high school girls who take a trip together from Tokyo to Antarctica. Each girl has her own distinct reason for making the trip. First, there’s Kimari, a curious girl desperate to not waste her youth any longer and instead seek something truly unique and difficult to accomplish. You’ll also meet Shirase, the daughter of an Antarctic explorer who tragically went missing.

These four girls are each so well-defined and endearing in their own ways, and their combined banter, teamwork, fights, and communal growth make for some of the best TV this year. In just twelve episodes we adventure to the mysterious wastes of Antarctica with four determined and lovable high school girls. By the end of it, neither they nor we will be the same.

Where to watch: Hulu


3. Fruits Basket (remake)


The original Fruits Basket from the early 00s is a fan-favorite and treasure of the anime community, but sadly it was never finished. The manga, however, was finished and so Fruits Basket has been given the ‘brotherhood treatment’ (totally re-vamped!) and at last, has an adaptation worthy of its source material. The anime follows the tragic-turned-magical story of Toru Honda, a high school girl who lost her mother and is now living alone in a tent in the woods, while still managing to keep her life somewhat together. One day, she stumbles upon the home of one of her classmates: a house in the woods populated by the actual animals of the Chinese Zodiac, disguised as human boys and men. Toru goes to live with, forms friendships with and learns from all of these quirky and strange individuals.

A character like Toru would usually be nothing more than a pair of eyes through which we see this strange world, but given her tragic backstory and optimistic personality, she’s quite the lovable character. Her closest friends, Arisa Uotani and Saki Hanajima, a former gang member and psychic respectively, are also both well-developed female forces to be reckoned with.

Where to watch: Netflix


4. Zombie Land Saga


J-Pop culture can be a toxic industry, especially for its women stars. It’s a dangerous game to play in many ways, and the creators of Zombie Land Saga know this. The show plays off the nastiness of the J-Pop industry with some clever satire and dark humor but is also a rollicking good time in its own right. The plot follows a group of girls who each, at the start of the show, die and wake up some years later as zombies, recruited by a shrewd manager looking to turn them into the next big idol group. The girls agree and begin their careers as a zombie J-Pop idol group.

From the beginning, the zombie girls have no memories of their former lives and are happy in their idols. Given the fact that these girls have no memories, thus no family or loved ones that they know of, the show heavily hammers home the idea that idols are essentially robots carrying out a function. If they had loved ones, memories, or dreams outside of being idols, it just wouldn’t work. But the reality is that they’re not robots—they are human girls—and we see later in the season this robotic fulfillment begin to fall apart.

A lot of the comedy comes from the slapstick you’d expect from a group of zombies: heads turning completely around and limbs detaching. But far more than that, Zombie Land Saga is a grizzly commentary on how idol girls are treated in Japan, by their fans, their managers, and by the demanding industry itself.

Where to watch: Amazon Prime Video


5. Revue Starlight


Stories of brotherly bonds and competitive duels can often be relegated to male-only affairs. However, Revue Starlight applies those themes to a pair of talented young women at an all-girls school of singers, dancers, and performers. When Karen’s childhood friend, Hikari, transfers to her school, Seisho Music Academy, her dream of performing in the musical Starlight escalates as the girls discover an elevator to a basement where girls duel for the top performer spot.

The contest is directed by a talking giraffe (because anime), but the contest itself is a gorgeous spectacle of beautiful animation. The story is overloaded with heart and charm as these two girls must do their best to remain sisterly friends, but also follow their dreams as far as they will take them.

Where to watch: YouTube


6. Violet Evergarden


What do you do when your purpose in life is taken away from you, and the only person who mattered is gone? That’s the question posed in Violet Evergarden, an anime about a young woman who was raised as a tool for warfare but taught humanity, empathy, and love by a man who was lost before the war came to an end. Without a war to fight and a major to guide her, Violet is like a lost child. After her arms, also lost in battle, are replaced by mechanical ones, she finds a job at the postal service writing letters to patrons’ loved ones. Her one purpose is now to understand love—the concept and the feeling—as the major had attempted to instill in her.

Violet Evergarden, aside from perhaps being the most beautifully drawn anime ever produced, presents us with a woman who has been shown the world as crafted by men. Men go to war, men teach her to read and write, and men show her love. But now, as peace settles, Violet must make a life of her own; she must seek purpose, love, and understanding on her own terms. It’s a subtle treatise on the autonomy of women in a world governed by men, all the while being a character-driven story about navigating an ever-changing and often frightening world.

Where to watch: Netflix