Acupuncture in Tokyo with Edward Obaidey

By Luisa Heenan
February 4, 2014
Health & Beauty

Eastern medicine and holistic healing plays a big part in my philosophy on ultimate health and wellbeing. Edward Obaidey’s clinic in Sangenjaya focuses on acupuncture, moxibustion and shiatsu, and has been a regular stop on my schedule for the past three years. The bilingual clinic has a strong sense of healing and warmth, and with Edward’s lighthearted and empathetic demeanor, patients feel very comfortable and open to the healing powers of Eastern medicine.

Edward

A leader of seminars worldwide, author of two published books, and director of a busy clinic in Tokyo for the past 20 years, there is no doubt that Edward is a guru in his field. So we sat down with him and asked him to answer some of his frequently asked questions.

How do acupuncture and moxibustion work? 

Basically put, it helps people get healthier. We identify imbalances in the body and seek to correct them. By using the concept of yin and yang (hot and cold), the two elements of needling and moxibustion are combined to balance out the system.

The ancient Chinese texts discuss in depth about the maintenance and improvement of health (versus disease). Although in this day and age, people often come in when they have an ailment. Rather than focusing on the direct issue, we spend time working on their overall system to assist with the healing process.

Who is it good for?

In my biased opinion, everybody! We can treat babies, the elderly, athletes, those with internal organ disease, mental and emotional concerns, etc. As mentioned before, it helps to make people healthier, and therefore, is suitable to everybody.

It is best that the person is open to healing. If the person has been forced in or has a strong mindset (which may have got them to the problem in the first place), they have to become unlocked or relaxed a little in order for them to receive treatment effectively.

Do you specialize in any specific women’s conditions?

Oriental medicine is generalist in nature. Whatever the issue, we are always seeking to find out the root of the problem and correct it accordingly. I liked to be called a generalist rather than a specialist.

Photo by Marnie Joyce cropped

Does it hurt?

It doesn’t need to hurt, and if it does hurt then often the technique isn’t good.

How many treatments are needed and how often do I have to come to see results?

It really depends on the problem, but generally after four to five treatments, someone will start to see results. For acute pain, if possible, I recommend every day or every other day. For those with chronic conditions, preferably once a week.

What should I expect?

Warm tea, a warm bed and a warm pair of hands. You will feel relaxed and sleepy after the treatment, which is a sign the body is resetting itself. Also mentally people’s outlook will improve and they will believe that they have the ability to get better.

What is your philosophy on health?

To let things occur with the minimum of interference; to live in harmony as much as you can and listen to your body; and to try to go with the things your body and the seasons are telling you.

Are there any side effects and anyone it isn’t suitable for?

Those that don’t have an open mind or those that wanted to be cured yesterday of their problems. It is recommended that schizophrenic patients have the support of their doctor.

 

For more information on Edward, his clinic and the treatments he offers, please contact him or his team at the number below.

The Deets

Address: 301 Corp. Sangenjaya, 2-17-12 Sangenjaya, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo

Tel: 03-3418-8989


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Acupuncture photo by Marnie Joyce.